What to See in England
By Gordon Home

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Public Domain Books


=How to get there.=–Train from Paddington. Great Western Railway. =Nearest Station.=–Warwick. =Distance from London.=–108 miles. =Average Time.=–Varies between 2-1/2 to 3-1/2 hours.

                     1st       2nd        3rd
=Fares.=–Single  15s. 3d.  10s. 2d.    8s. 1-1/2d.
          Return  28s. 3d.  17s. 10d.  16s. 3d.

=Accommodation Obtainable.=–"Warwick Arms Hotel,” “Woolpack Hotel,” “Globe Hotel,” etc.

A charge of one shilling is made for admission to Warwick Castle, the gardens and state apartments being shown to visitors.

Warwick is a small but historic town, charmingly situated on the River Avon, and dominated by its castle, one of the very few baronial castles still remaining entire. The town was destroyed by the Danes, but it was rebuilt by King Alfred’s Ethelfleda, who also built a fortress on an artificial mound, overlooking the river. By the orders of William I. the castle was enlarged, and afterwards given by the Conqueror to Henry de Newburgh, whom he made the first Earl of Warwick of the Norman line. The castle was of such strength that when, in the reign of Henry III., it became the property of Margery, sister of Thomas de Newburgh, she was informed that she would not be allowed to marry any one in whom the king had not great confidence. The castle afterwards passed into the hands of the Beauchamps, in whose family it remained until 1445, when the heiress, Anne, married Richard Neville, the “King-maker,” who took the title of Earl of Warwick. The title without the estates was given by James I. to Robert, Lord Rich. The castle was given to Sir Fulke Greville, afterwards Lord Brooke. In 1759, when Edward Rich died without issue, Francis Greville was made Earl of Warwick, with whose descendants the estates have since remained. The entrance to the castle is along a winding road cut for more than 100 yards out of the solid rock. The castle as it now stands is a splendid specimen of the fourteenth-century stronghold built in the transition period, when the mere fortress was being superseded by a building of more grace and comfort. St. Mary’s Church in Warwick was rebuilt in the reign of Queen Anne, the former church, built by Thomas Beauchamp, Earl of Warwick, having been destroyed by fire in 1694. Guy’s Cliff, situated 1-1/4 miles from Warwick, is a most picturesque spot, and is celebrated, according to tradition, as the retreat of Guy of Warwick.

A charge of threepence each person (no fee less than sixpence) is made, for admission to St. Mary’s Church.

[Illustration: Photochrom Co., Ltd. WARWICK CASTLE ON THE AVON.

One of the very few baronial castles still remaining entire.]


Preface  •  Ham House and Petersham  •  Walton-On-Thames (scold’s Bridle)  •  Harrow  •  Holwood House, Keston  •  Chigwell, Essex  •  Waltham Abbey and Cross  •  Downe  •  Epsom: Its Races and Its Salts  •  Epping Forest  •  Hampton Court  •  Rye House, Broxbourne  •  Hatfield House, Herts  •  Runnymead, the Signing of Magna Charta  •  The Oldest Brass in England  •  St. Albans  •  Stoke Poges Church, Bucks  •  Windsor  •  Jordans and William Penn  •  Knole House and Sevenoaks  •  Greenstead Church  •  Chalfont St. Giles  •  Westerham  •  Guildford, Surrey  •  Gad’s Hill  •  Ightham Mote, Kent  •  Penshurst  •  St. Michael’s Mount and Marazion  •  Rochester Cathedral  •  Tunbridge Wells  •  The Quintain Post At Offham and Malling Abbey  •  Eversley  •  Farnham, Surrey  •  Hindhead, Surrey  •  Shottermill  •  Penn’s Chapel At Thakeham, Sussex  •  Chawton the Home of Jane Austen  •  Selborne  •  Elstow  •  Lewes, Sussex  •  Bodiam Castle, Sussex  •  Colchester, Essex  •  Layer Marney  •  Battle Abbey  •  Cambridge  •  Arundel Castle  •  Olney, Bucks  •  Wantage and the Country of Alfred the Great  •  Canterbury and Its Cathedral  •  Reculvers  •  Oxford  •  Midhurst  •  Pevensey Castle  •  Savernake Forest  •  Ely Cathedral  •  St. Ives, Huntingdonshire  •  Winchelsea and Rye  •  Blenheim Palace  •  Peterborough Cathedral and Crowland  •  Peterborough  •  Southampton  •  Helmingham Hall  •  Stonehenge, Wiltshire  •  Netley Abbey  •  Salisbury and Its Cathedral  •  Sandwich, Kent  •  New Forest, Hampshire  •  Osborne House  •  Carisbrooke Castle  •  Lutterworth  •  Compton Wynyates  •  Kenilworth Castle  •  Belvoir Castle  •  Bath  •  Boston and the Pilgrim Fathers  •  Warwick  •  Gloucester and Its Cathedral  •  Norfolk Broads  •  Norwich Cathedral  •  Lichfield  •  Sherborne and Its Abbey Church  •  Newark  •  Wells and Its Cathedral  •  Stratford-On-Avon  •  Burnham Thorpe, Norfolk  •  Lulworth Cove, Dorsetshire  •  Corfe Castle  •  Lincoln and Its Cathedral  •  Somerset, the Birthplace of Tennyson  •  Glastonbury Abbey  •  Walsingham, Norfolk  •  Cheddar Caves, Cheddar, Somerset  •  Newstead Abbey  •  The Wessex of Thomas Hardy’s Romances  •  Tintern Abbey  •  Chesterfield, Derbyshire  •  Dukeries  •  Haddon Hall, Derbyshire  •  The Isle of Athelney, and Sedgemoor  •  Raglan Castle  •  Dovedale  •  Wellington and the Wrekin, Shropshire  •  Wroxeter and the Roman City of Uriconium, Salop  •  Buildwas Abbey, Shropshire  •  Ludlow and Its Castle  •  Shrewsbury  •  Buxton and the Peak District  •  Tewkesbury  •  Exeter and Its Cathedral  •  Market Drayton, Salop  •  Chester  •  Exmoor  •  Knutsford  •  Torr Steps On the Barle, Somerset  •  Cleeve Abbey, Somerset  •  Hawarden  •  York Minster  •  Coxwold, Yorkshire  •  Llangollen and Valle Crucis Abbey  •  Knaresborough, Dripping Well  •  Fountains Abbey  •  Ripon Cathedral  •  Dartmoor  •  Haworth  •  Rievaulx Abbey  •  Brixham, Devon  •  Conway Castle  •  The Doone Valley, Exmoor  •  Llandovery, South Wales  •  Dartmouth, Devon  •  Richmond, Yorkshire  •  Tintagel  •  Whitby  •  Carnarvon Castle  •  Plymouth  •  Durham and Its Cathedral  •  Raby Castle, Durham  •  Snowdon  •  Harlech Castle  •  Grasmere and Rydal Mount  •  The Lake District  •  St. Davids Cathedral  •  Furness Abbey, Lancashire  •  Monkwearmouth, Near Jarrow  •  The Isle of Man  •  Brantwood  •  Fowey  •  Hexham and Hadrian’s Wall  •  The Lake District  •  Keswick  •  Alnwick Castle  •  Lanercost Priory, Cumberland  •  Lanercost Priory and Stepping-Stones.]  •  St. Ives, Cornwall  •  Bamborough Castle, Northumberland

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What to see in England;: A guide to places of historic interest, natural beauty or literary association,
By Gordon Home
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