True Version of the Philippine Revolution
By Don Emilio Aguinaldo y Famy

Presented by

Public Domain Books


[1] A kind of sword–Translator.

[2] Of their own free will and accord–Translator.

[3] Suspension bridge.–Translator.

[4] Philippine Local Exhibition.–Translator.

[5] Short sword–Translator.

[6] The “Black Hole” of Manila.

[7] Many of the American papers reported that the majority was onevote only in excess of the absolutely requisite two-thirds majority.


Introduction  •  Chapter I. The Revolution of 1896  •  Chapter II. The Treaty of Biak-na-bató  •  Chapter III. Negotiations  •  Chapter IV. The Revolution of 1898  •  Chapter V. The Dictatorial Government  •  Chapter VI. The First Triumphs  •  Chapter VII. The Philippine Flag  •  Chapter VIII. Expedition to Bisayas  •  Chapter IX. The Steamer “Compania de Filipinas”  •  Chapter X. The Proclamation of Independence  •  Chapter XI. The Spanish Commission  •  Chapter XII. More American Troops  •  Chapter XIII. The Thirteenth of August  •  Chapter XIV. First Clouds  •  Chapter XV. Vain Hopes  •  Chapter XVI. The American Commission  •  Chapter XVII. Impolitic Acts  •  Chapter XVIII. The Mixed Commission  •  Chapter XIX. Outbreak of Hostilities  •  Notes  •