True Version of the Philippine Revolution
By Don Emilio Aguinaldo y Famy

Presented by

Public Domain Books

Chapter XVIII. The Mixed Commission

Conferences of the Mixed Commission, Americans and Filipinos, were held in Manila from the 11th to the 31st of the said month of January, the Filipino Commissioners clearly expressing the wish of our people for recognition as an independent nation.

They also frankly stated the complaints of the Filipino people about the abuses and atrocities of the American soldiery, being attentively and benevolently listened to by the American Commissioners. The latter replied that they had no authority to recognize the Filipino Government, their mission being limited to hearing what the Filipinos said, to collect data to formulate the will of our people and transmit it fully and faithfully to the Government of Washington, who alone could arrive at a definite decision on the subject. These conferences ended in perfect harmony, auguring well for happier times and definite peace when Mr. McKinley should reply to General Otis’s telegrams transmitting our wishes with his favourable recommendations, as the American Commissioners said.


Introduction  •  Chapter I. The Revolution of 1896  •  Chapter II. The Treaty of Biak-na-bató  •  Chapter III. Negotiations  •  Chapter IV. The Revolution of 1898  •  Chapter V. The Dictatorial Government  •  Chapter VI. The First Triumphs  •  Chapter VII. The Philippine Flag  •  Chapter VIII. Expedition to Bisayas  •  Chapter IX. The Steamer “Compania de Filipinas”  •  Chapter X. The Proclamation of Independence  •  Chapter XI. The Spanish Commission  •  Chapter XII. More American Troops  •  Chapter XIII. The Thirteenth of August  •  Chapter XIV. First Clouds  •  Chapter XV. Vain Hopes  •  Chapter XVI. The American Commission  •  Chapter XVII. Impolitic Acts  •  Chapter XVIII. The Mixed Commission  •  Chapter XIX. Outbreak of Hostilities  •  Notes